By Sergey Uhanov (Certified Veterinarian)Dr. Sergey Uhanov Last updated: 22nd January 2024

Bullmation

By

Sergey Uhanov (Certified Veterinarian) Dr. Sergey Uhanov
Last updated: 22nd January 2024

The Bullmation, or Bullmatian, is a designer cross of the Bulldog and the Dalmatian. Playful, attentive, and outgoing, it is rapidly gaining popularity among pet owners. Solid and muscular like the Bulldog with the unique spotted coat of the Dalmatian, its drooping ears, broad skull, stocky body, and almond-shaped eyes make it a perfect blend of the two breeds.

Quick Information

Other namesBullmatian
CoatShort, smooth, and straight
ColorPale or white with black, brown, fawn, orange, red, blue, or lemon patches
Breed typeCrossbreed
Group Companion
Life expectancy8 – 12 years
SizeMedium
Height11 – 24 inches
Weight41 – 65 pounds
Litter Size5 – 8 puppies
Behavioral Characteristics Affectionate, loyal, charming, playful, and social
Good with children Yes
Barking Tendency High; they bark while guarding and are loud snorers
Climate compatibilityModerate; they are not suited for extreme climates
Apartment compatibilityLow; they require open spaces or backyards
Do they shedThey have low to moderate shedding
Are they hypoallergenicNo
TrainabilityModerate; they can be stubborn
How much do they cost$800 – $1,200
Competitive Registration Qualification/ InformationACHC, DDKC, DRA, IDCR
CountryAfghanistan

History and Origin

Unlike most hybrids, Bullmations did not originate from the US. They first emerged in Afghanistan around thirty years ago, and their popularity immediately skyrocketed in the West due to their charming looks and endearing demeanor. However, these puppies are often neglected in adoption centers today despite their fame. Thus, enthusiasts encourage people to consider adoption while looking for prospective breeders for this variety. Due to their status as a designer breed, eminent clubs like the AKC do not recognize them.

Temperament and Personality

These energetic and lively dogs do well in active households where they get plenty of attention and playtime. They are highly attached to their owners and follow them everywhere, often suffering from separation anxiety if left alone for long. Incredibly social, they get along excellently with other pets and kids if adequately socialized. Otherwise, they are wary around strangers and may bark at them. This loyalty makes them brilliant watchdogs who are always alert for danger.

Their flat faces, inherited from the Bulldog, make them loud snorers and unsuitable for those looking for a quiet pet. Also, they can exhibit unruly behavior if bored, becoming a nuisance if left unchecked. Despite these situations, these affectionate, enthusiastic, and cheerful crosses love being the center of attention and make splendid companions for all kinds of families.

Care

Exercise

They need adequate physical and mental exercise to stay healthy and prevent restlessness. An hour to an hour-and-a-half of daily activity is ideal for your companion. Running, biking, hiking, cycling, and fetch are excellent workouts to indulge in as a pair. Dog parks are a superb alternative for those who do not have access to a yard or open field for playtime. Interactive games, toys, and puzzles are fantastic sources of mental stimulation. They are also great candidates for sports like agility and obedience.

Grooming

They are comparatively low maintenance, requiring only two to three weekly brushings to manage shed fur. They might inherit the skin folds of their Bulldog parent, so you must wipe them regularly with a dedicated cleanser to avoid bacterial build-up. Proper dental hygiene is also necessary to prevent tooth decay. Lastly, clean their ears periodically and trim their nails as needed.

Health Problems

As crossbreeds, they can develop complications from both lines. Common problems include entropion, patellar luxation, dermatitis, brachycephalic syndrome, GDV or bloat, reverse sneezing, hip dysplasia, urolithiasis, pyoderma, bladder stones, and deafness. Timely checkups can prevent many of these issues and ensure a long and fulfilled life.

Health Problems

As crossbreeds, they can develop complications from both lines. Common problems include entropion, patellar luxation, dermatitis, brachycephalic syndrome, GDV or bloat, reverse sneezing, hip dysplasia, urolithiasis, pyoderma, bladder stones, and deafness. Timely checkups can prevent many of these issues and ensure a long and fulfilled life.

Feeding

Fix their diet for a medium-sized hybrid with moderate to high energy levels. Two to three cups daily of high-quality dry kibble, split into two or more meals, is ideal for an adult. If you choose to add canned food, ensure that the kibble amount is adjusted accordingly. Avoid overfeeding as they tend to overeat and become obese.

Training

Bullmations can be challenging to train because they are strong-willed and stubborn, making them unfit for first-time owners. When handled by an experienced person with authority and patience, they grow up to become well-behaved and loving companions.

Socialization: Early socialization is crucial to help them acclimatize to strangers and unfamiliar environments. It also helps curb stubbornness and misbehavior caused due to boredom. Expose them to new places, people, and animals from a young age to dispel their fears. Positioning yourself as the pack leader is vital to reduce disobedience and encourage good manners. Prioritize positive reinforcement, treats, and rewards over harsh corrections.

Obedience: Establishing a secure foundation is the first step in having a well-mannered pet. Commands such as sit, stay, heel, and down help create a strong base for further training. Hiring a professional trainer is a good idea if their headstrong attitude persists. Dog training school can also assist with socialization and obedience. Finally, crate training is an excellent tool to help relieve anxiety and potty train your pup.

Interesting Facts

  • Despite lacking recognition from official kennel clubs, owners can register their Bullmations at organizations such as the American Canine Hybrid Club (ACHC), the Dog Registry of America, Inc. (DRA), the Designer Dogs Kennel Club (DDKC), and the International Designer Canine Registry (IDCR).

FAQS

1. What is the difference between a Bullmation and a Boxweiler?

Boxweilers share a common ancestor with the Bullmation but mixed with a Rottweiler instead of a Dalmatian. They are relatively larger and have higher energy levels.

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