7 Responses to Bernedoodle

  1. Terry says:

    Can they be trained for a service dog? How easily are they trained?

  2. dewey beckner says:

    Is the expected life span greater for the smaller mix ??? What about the intelligence level? Is it the same for the middle size??

  3. Carol says:

    We’re looking for Havapoos Puppies in RI preferred anyone know breeders contact me.

  4. Cindy Ragland says:

    How much do u get for your burnese Mt. Pups and the mixed

  5. Bridgdt says:

    Looking for a new puppy.

    • dewey beckner says:

      Is the expected life span greater for the smaller mix ??? What about the intelligence level? Is it the same for the middle size?? We are not in a big hurry. My wife is still mentally recovering from the loss of rescue dog of 13 years. We like the tri color with tan eyebrows. We are concerned about life span and intelligence.

      • Kristy says:

        It says the life span is between 7-15, averaging 10-11 years. It just depends on the breeding really.

        We have a mini bernedoodle, and she is hands down the most amazing dog we could have ever asked for. We have 3 kids, 8-17 years of age, and she is fantastic with them. She’s just energetic enough that she loves to play whenever the opportunity arises (which at our house is fairly often), but when it comes time to cuddle, she settles down almost immediately and is super content being snuggled and petted until the next opportunity for play comes around. She was a breeze to train…she is the most intelligent dog I’ve ever had the pleasure of training…and catches on amazingly fast. I previously had only ever owned German Shepards my entire life because my father raised them, and I went years without having any dogs for the same reason you are concerned about your wife now. My Devi, a German Shepard that I had in my life for almost 10 years, had hip dysplasia so bad that it got to the point that she couldn’t move without being in terrible pain constantly, and her quality of life had diminished so badly that I had to make the decision to put her to rest. It is still to this day the hardest and most painful thing I have ever done. That was almost 20 years ago. It took me this long to get the courage to open my heart up again, and my only regret is that I didn’t do it sooner. I forgot how it feels to love a dog and to have a dog love you back. It’s one of the purest forms of love we’ll ever know. To let the fear of losing them keep you and some lucky dog from having that kind of love in your life, I now know is worse than losing them. I would take whatever time is needed to heal, because she does need to heal, and then embrace this breed. I am confident that you will not regret it.

        Our Carly is actually a rescue. She came from some Amish puppy mill in southern Illinois. They were going to just dispose of her because she has a deformed ear, and there’s some issues with her hearing and vision, but other than that, she seems to be in very good health. But you know how puppy mills are, you can’t sell damaged goods, so she was garbage to them. I cannot stress how much I loathe these kids of people. They are the lowest forms of human garbage, and I wish there were stricter laws on breeding. But really the demand for these people is continued by consumers, so. Anyway…thankfully some good people intervened, and that didn’t happen, but now she was in need of a home. It was a scary decision for me to take her, not knowing if there may be some more serious underlying health issues that could cause her to inevitably be taken from us earlier than normal, but it only took seeing her, and feeling the energy that she had, and I was a goner. So when the time is right, do yourself the favor and open your home to one of these dogs. Just make sure when you do that you get one from a reputable breeder!

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